Posts Tagged ‘response’

Once again I dare to put words to the thoughts provoked by Corvus’ monthly round table. The red thread for April 2008 is Variations on a Theme, what is your favorite, or least favorite games, and what do they have in common that might be the reason for this?

Now, side-quests are usually disliked by gamers. They are also by me. I spent a long time getting to the feature that will make or break many games for me. It will be easier going away from it and look at what side-quests tick for me.

Why do I like side-quests? I guess it may be because they let me roam a bit more in the world I am occupying at the time. I like a game with more space to move in than needed for running from point A to point B in order to get the plot.

Why do I like side-quests? Well, they tell me more about the world and it’s inhabitants. I can get to know more of the world without reading up on it.

Why do I like side-quests? I can get more story out of the game, when I want. If I want.

I love reading books, mostly fantasy and science fiction. I love story, worlds that make sense. Well, makes sense according to it’s own rules. Hyperdrives and magic is fine. Games have a story world, and they use and portray them with varying degrees of success. Some games rely on the world being made popular and known to the player outside of the game, before the player sits down and starts up the game.

This is a good thing. I want to have a world that is detailed, fleshed out. For worlds other than our own our knowledge vary. Star Wars’ world is one I am fairly acquainted with, both through the movies and through books and games. The story world of Planescape was less known to me; it still is. But it was a world filled with optional side-quests, it told me of Sigil, of the planes and a little about the Nameless One.

Coming to think of it; in open worlds it is not so much the quest part that counts. The quest is usually there for the player to take notice and bother. For my part some of those quests that take you out and about could be left out. What encourages me is the ability to wander about and discover something unique. The random encounters in Fallout were like this. No quest tied them in, just persistence and luck. I enjoyed Oblivion for a while too – wandering about encountering dungeons, ruins and caves. Sadly, they weren’t that unique, and they didn’t tell a story.

Betrayal at Krondor was the first game I played that let me roam the world, doing what I wanted to before moving on. It is still one of my favorites. When I come think of it; the roaming an looking for stories and side-quests is what I like. Looking for something that is hidden, meant only for gamers who care. Those who explore. Who flee into the game world.

Side-quests usually offer a reward that increase your power in the game. Magical items or experience in RPGs, More troops or items in strategy games. Bonus levels, more points, money, fame. Stuff that makes the game easier. For someone like me who are bad at powergaming; I make wrong character builds, do thing because it fits with the role I’m playing. For someone like me, these optional quests are not that optional. I need better equipment and magic and stuff to get through the plot. I don’t like those optional side-quests at all.

When it comes down to it, what I like in games are freedom, choice, richness of story… I want a story world I can lose myself in, one that makes me feel joy, frustration, happiness, hate. Take your quests, I’ll look at them and discard them. If they intrigue me or offer me something I like, I’ll take them.

Perhaps I should have gone with the original title for this post? Free will, or the illusion thereof. Side-quests really are something that destroys a game for me.

Please visit the Round Table’s Main Hall for links to all entries.

There are those games you just never get to finish, but you still play them. You do not play them because they are fun, but because you have to. You have, after all, paid good money for the game, and maybe even played it for a bit. Playing for these reasons are, in fact, to throw good money after bad.

I have been moderately successful in keeping these sunk costs out of my equations; I have books I have never finished, games bought and paid for that never showed me their end of game credits, movies I never finished.

I recently told a friend I was thinking about how much work it is to play games sometimes. When you have to play even though it isn’t really fun.. —Why play if it isn’t fun? he asked me. At which I replied Why do you play World of Warcraft?. That is a game where I believe an enormous part of the player base is playing just because they have so much invested in it. Money; both up front and in monthly fees, Time; hundreds and thousands of hours spent working to get the best equipment possible. And emotions. My friend plays it mainly, if not solely, because he has made friends there. Friends he have little chance of meeting without crossing country borders. Friends that have little in common other than playing WoW. He has quit, stopped paying, deleted characters many times, but still he starts again.

I’m currently avoiding playing through Icewind Dale 2. Still. It is old and I kind of don’t like it. Then I read Slipping into Oblivion over at A Slime Appears. That article made me think a bit. And I am doing just exactly what I’ve been advocating against for a long long time. I’m playing because, I don’t know. he’s on third and I don’t give a darn!

What you mean? Monkey Island 1 and 2 had perfect voice talent!

I came across Man Bytes Blog through the Brainy Gamer podcast. I’ve visited Corvus’ blog earlier, but now I’ll stay. Anyhow; he has got this thing going with inviting other bloggers, any blogger, to share their thought at a topic. I’ll toss in a few words at what voices in games mean to me.

I have a history of escaping into other worlds. It happens fairly often, and usually this is into books, my own thoughts, (pen and paper) role-playing games, and computer games. The latter happens less often now, and not only because I try spending less time at them. I find myself treating them more as things to be understood and solved, rather than worlds to live.

Apart from having my old Commodore 64 talk at me, my most memorable moment with voice talent in games are with Curse of Monkey Island. Or rather with the original Monkey Island, and the surprising silence I experienced as the first lines of text appeared. I had just played CMI and picked down my copy of Monkey Island from the shelf, wanting to live its magic again.

My experience playing the Monkey Island games changed from this; or in a way it did not. I never reacted to Guybrush’s voice in Monkey Island 3 – other than that it fit perfectly, but I when I played the prequels again it was Dominic’s voice I heard inside my head. I could’ve sworn at the time that his was the voice I had had in mind for Guybrush while playing the prequels years before, prior to experiencing CMI.

When applying voice talent, I have no trouble supplying my own voices. At least for my own character, and then especially if I had a hand in creating him myself. I can accept there only being voice done for certain characters. I might even prefer that only some lines for certain characters were done in voice. Like when you meet any major character, like Tandi, in the first Fallout game. You’re given a hint or an example, and your mind fills it in expertly at any other time you read her lines.

What jars it for me is anything that ruins the image of the world created. Anything my brain has to fill in itself will be good, or perfect, if there is mood. But if it is supplied for me, I will be critical to anything that threatens suspension of disbelief. Voices not matching the character? Bad lip-sync? People never mentioning my name even if it is written in the subtitles?

In the end I think I prefer making up the voices myself. But when it is done right, I won’t argue against them. For me it is very much akin to graphics. Trying to make it perfect and missing – disastrous. Better to just make it good enough, and let my mind do what it does best.

Filling in the blanks.

Please visit the Round Table’s Main Hall for links to all entries.

I think a lot. I like to think.

As I delve deeper into what has been called the Blogosphere I get across lots and lots of information; thought and rants and reviews and discussions… stuff that make me think.

Reading, listening, watching. It all makes me think, but keeping my thoughts to myself is kind of limiting. It doesn’t lead anywhere. No new impulses. I kill the thoughts, removing (almost) any chance of discovering holes in my logic, strength in my views.

Thoughts have little value if not shared, but I am scared at the prospect of sharing my thoughts. What if I think stupid thoughts? If I get responses, do I have to respond? What if I have no good response? What to do with responses I don’t agree with? With responses that make me not agree with what I wrote?

Other people have had these questions themselves before me, I have seen examples of this being solved. I’ll try and post my thoughts, my responses to other people here.

Wish me luck.